4 Businesses That Immediately Regretted Their Decisions

Everyone makes mistakes, but not everyone is the CEO of a massive international corporation. When we make a bad call, we kick ourselves and move on. When the heroes of capital mess up, the earth shakes. Investors lose their shirts. Workers lose their jobs. The chattering class piles on and high-flying careers implode—either that or leaders learn from the mistake and steer their companies in a different direction.

http://www.fashionbeans.com/content/businesses-that-immediately-regretted-their-decisions?rtg=mhwhm-jk1tYH&param4=fsb-fni-fbss-2856-eint-mo-ocpm-pengage&param5=10154383426296186&param6=23842855853270336

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(27) ” DRIFTING AWAY IN THE TIDE ” : WATER SYMBOLISM AND INDIGENOUS ENVIRONMENTALISM IN EDEN ROBINSON’S MONKEY BEACH | Ina Habermann – Academia.edu

Ina Habermann

University of Bonn

Abstract

Like the protagonist of her debut novel, Eden Robinson is a member of the HaislaFirst Nation, whose reserve is located in the Kitimat district at British Columbia’scoastline. While Robinson’s novel was published sixteen years ago, the issue ofenvironmental pollution is even more pressing and prevalent today. Referring toecological damages, this article will examine to what extent non-sustainable thinking,outdated government plans and pipeline projects affect British Columbia’senvironment nowadays. By placing nature above human and especially byhighlighting the power of water, Robinson’s fiction almost gains a forebodingcharacter. The water spirituality of the Haisla Nation, as it is represented in

Monkey Beach

, has an essential position that must not be neglected or underestimated.Connecting the water symbolism with present environmental activism offers a new perspective on contemporary Indigenous environmentalism. This article analyzes howRobinson’s novel raises the awareness of Indigenous ways of understanding, livingwith, and respecting water and the environment as something—at least—equal.Contemporary environmental activism aims at both raising awareness and changing public policy to a more sustainable as well as preservative attitude while Robinson’sfiction joins this site of resistance

https://www.academia.edu/35251737/_DRIFTING_AWAY_IN_THE_TIDE_WATER_SYMBOLISM_AND_INDIGENOUS_ENVIRONMENTALISM_IN_EDEN_ROBINSONS_MONKEY_BEACH?auto=download&campaign=weekly_digest

(27) Book Review: The United Nations World Water Development Reports: A Comparison and Contrasts of 2016 and 2017 Reports | Deep Francis – Academia.edu

A

BSTRACT
The UN 2030 sustainable development agenda places a huge emphasis on promotingeconomic growth by catering to social needs ranging from education, health, socialprotection, and job opportunities while tackling climate change and environmental pro-tection. UN publishes thematic reports, the World water development report (WWDR)which focus on different strategic water issues to facilitate decision making for sustain-able development. This article is a comparative review of UN-WWDR 2016 which fo-cuses on water and job creation with UN-WWDR 2017 which elucidates on the potentialof wastewater

https://www.academia.edu/35510868/Book_Review_The_United_Nations_World_Water_Development_Reports_A_Comparison_and_Contrasts_of_2016_and_2017_Reports?auto=download&campaign=weekly_digest

(27) The Future is Now | Steven Hartman – Academia.edu

to coincide with the two-year anniversary of the ParisAgreement on climate change, which was signed on 12 December 2015. Theagreement was a landmark achievement of coordinated global action onenvironmental change, based on extensive data and findings collected from theinternational scientific community and evaluated rigorously inthe 5th AssessmentReport of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The ParisA

https://www.academia.edu/35507250/The_Future_is_Now

(27) Linstroth Interview with Ian Trottier (December 20) on poetry book, The Forgotten Shore | J. P. Linstroth – Academia.edu

Ian Hamilton Trottier (Radio Host) & J. P. Linstroth (Author/Academic)
RADIO INTERVIEW WITH IAN TROTTIER ON “IAN TROTTIERSHOW” ON WYNWOOD RADIO (MIAMI), ONLINE RADIO ABOUT MY NEW BOOK OF POETRY,
THE FORGOTTEN SHORE
(Poetic Matrix Press, 2017)

https://www.academia.edu/35481340/Linstroth_Interview_with_Ian_Trottier_December_20_on_poetry_book_The_Forgotten_Shore?auto=download&campaign=weekly_digest

https://theconversation.cmail20.com/t/ViewEmail/r/F96C60BBC41C90A62540EF23F30FEDED/F2FDD1289203FC88667CCDA886AB700A

Artificial intelligence, or AI, is everywhere – it’s helping cars navigate roads, robots sort parcels and internet users buy more products. But what happens when AI tries to help us interpret what we see in nature?

Each year mobile phone users are adding tens of millions of photos of plants and animals onto the internet. This remarkable trove of data is helping researchers map biodiversity and see the world in exciting new ways. But the data is also being used – often without the users’ knowledge – to train computer vision technology through machine learning.

For me, this raises some interesting questions. What happens when we turn to a centralised AI, rather than to other people, to help us interpret the flora and fauna around us? What level of transparency and control should we have when it comes to sharing our encounters with nature? And ultimately, if this technology is inevitable, are we programming AI, or is AI programming us?

https://theconversation.cmail20.com/t/ViewEmail/r/F96C60BBC41C90A62540EF23F30FEDED/F2FDD1289203FC88667CCDA886AB700A