Australia needs to embrace, not fear, automation, new study says

Over the past 15 years, Australians have reduced the amount of time spent on physical and routine tasks at work by two hours each week thanks to automation. Retail workers have spent less time ringing up items and more time helping customers, bank employees less time counting banknotes and more time giving financial advice. And if Australia plays its cards right, we could be making $2.2 trillion from automation by 2030, according to research commissioned by Google. Dr Andrew Charlton, Director of research firm AlphaBeta who undertook the study, says Australian policy makers and companies must take action now to embrace technology while also taking steps to reskill Australia’s most vulnerable workers

http://www.theage.com.au/technology/technology-news/australia-needs-to-embrace-not-fear-automation-new-study-says-20170809-gxsyzg.html?platform=hootsuite

The Science of Stress and How Our Emotions Affect Our Susceptibility to Burnout and Disease – Brain Pickings

How your memories impact your immune system, why moving is one of the most stressful life-events, and what your parents have to do with your predisposition to PTSD. BY MARIA POPOVA I had lived thirty good years before enduring my first food poisoning — odds quite fortunate in the grand scheme of things, but miserably unfortunate in the immediate experience of it. I found myself completely incapacitated to erect the pillars of my daily life — too cognitively foggy to read and write, too physically weak to work out or even meditate. The temporary disability soon elevated the assault on my mind and body to a new height of anguish: an intense experience of stress. Even as I consoled myself with Nabokov’s exceptionally florid account of food poisoning, I couldn’t shake the overwhelming malaise that had engulfed me — somehow, a physical illness had completely colored my psychoemotional reality

https://www.brainpickings.org/2015/07/20/esther-sternberg-balance-within-stress-emotion/

Michael Rosen’s Sad Book: A Beautiful Anatomy of Loss, Illustrated by Quentin Blake – Brain Pickings

“Sometimes I’m sad and I don’t know why. It’s just a cloud that comes along and covers me up.” BY MARIA POPOVA “Grief, when it comes, is nothing like we expect it to be,” Joan Didion wrote after losing the love of her life. “The people we most love do become a physical part of us,” Meghan O’Rourke observed in her magnificent memoir of loss, “ingrained in our synapses, in the pathways where memories are created.” Those wildly unexpected dimensions of grief and the synaptic traces of love are what celebrated British children’s book writer and poet Michael Rosen confronted when his eighteen-year-old son Eddie died suddenly of meningitis. Never-ending though the process of mourning may be, Rosen set out to exorcise its hardest edges and subtlest shapes five years later in Michael Rosen’s Sad Book (public library) — an immensely moving addition to the finest children’s books about loss, illustrated by none other than the great Quentin Blake

https://www.brainpickings.org/2015/08/25/michael-rosens-sad-book-quentin-blake/

Peanuts and the Quiet Pain of Childhood: How Charles Schulz Made an Art of Difficult Emotions – Brain Pickings

“[Charlie Brown] reminded people, as no other cartoon character had, of what it was to be vulnerable, to be small and alone in the universe, to be human — both little and big at the same time.” BY MARIA POPOVA J.R.R. Tolkien adamantly asserted that there is no such thing as writing “for children” and Neil Gaiman has repeatedly championed the notion that children shouldn’t be protected from dark emotions, and yet such voices remain rare radicals in a culture that continues to treat the child’s inner world as desperately fragile and childhood itself as a one-dimensional idyll. What made Charles Schulz’s iconic Peanuts series so beloved was precisely its dimensional and complex view of childhood — something Schulz achieved by thrusting his characters into such unpopular yet essential circumstances of the soul as boredom and uncertainty. In Schulz and Peanuts: A Biography (public library), writer David Michaelis traces how this singular creative genius originated in the complex experience of Schulz’s own early life. Charles Schulz in 1956 (Photograph by Roger Higgins courtesy Library of Congress) Unlike classic cartoon masters who made distraction their medium, Schulz filled his comic strips with suspended action and deliberate empty spaces, in which the characters — as well as the reader — confront the uncertainties and protracted desperations of life. Michaelis writes:

https://www.brainpickings.org/2015/01/20/charles-schulz-peanuts-biography-david-michaelis/